ANI, BAE invest in fully electric tube benders for Future Frigate programme
 

ANI, BAE invest in fully electric tube benders for Future Frigate programme

ANI, BAE invest in fully electric tube benders for Future Frigate programme

AMOB tube benders become instrumental to Australia’s largest peacetime warship building programme, under a £20 billion contract to produce nine high-tech ‘future frigates’.

BAE Systems were selected as the preferred tenderer and won the Sea 5000 programme with its high-tech ‘Type 26’ frigate proposal in 2018, and production has recently begun in Adelaide.

“BAE Systems’ selection as preferred tenderer for SEA 5000 reinforces our position as a leading designer and builder of complex maritime platforms,” said BAE Systems chief executive, Charles Woodburn. The proposal by the British multinational arms company was thought to be the most advanced of the three proposals put forward and beat Spanish and Italian competitors for the contract.

Purchased by the Australian Naval Infrastructure (ANI), the two large fully electric tube bending machines (and one roll bending machine) recently made their way across the ocean to their new home. Departing from AMOB’s headquarters and manufacturing facility in Portugal, the machines travelled over 10,000 miles to Southern Australia, to be used by BAE Systems in the construction of the war ships.

Australian Naval Insfrastructure (ANI)

In March 2017, the Australian government established the Australian Naval Infrastructure (ANI) PTY Ltd, which facilitates the development and construction of new infrastructure at the Osborne shipbuilding facility in Adelaide.

‘Nine of the world’s most advanced anti-submarine warfare frigates will be constructed in Australia, and the prototyping phase marks the beginning of a decades-long program that will be the cornerstone of continuous naval shipbuilding in Australia,’ commented Ms. Lutz, Defence’s Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group’s First Assistant Secretary.‘The Osborne shipyard is a world-leading shipyard, which will enable Australian industry do its job constructing this advanced fleet of frigates for the nation. Raising the capability of Australia’s shipbuilding industry is central to the National Naval Shipbuilding Enterprise’.

Ms. Lutz said the prototyping phase of the Hunter-class frigate program would end in 2023.

Enjoy our videos!

Two Fully Electric Tube Benders from Portugal

The fully electric eMOB-100 and eMOB-225 will see BAE Systems able to bend complex ship parts in tube as wide as 219mm, and with wall thicknesses of up to 12mm. The adoption of very large industrial tube benders to the process will replace older techniques of welding bent parts to straight parts – an extremely time-expensive operation. With the investment of these machines higher quality components can be manufactured in a fraction of the time, with superior accuracy and consistency.


Despite being immense machines, AMOB UK’s contribution to the project is only a tiny component of a momentous project. This project will see dozens of the best companies in the world collaborate, and see thousands more jobs created. ‘As always, we are very proud to supply these machines, and of the hard work of everyone at AMOB’ said Tom Wood, Managing Director of AMOB UK, ‘we are excited to continue to work strongly with ANI, BAE, and all other parties involved in making the project a success.’

Fully Electric Tube Bender eMOB 225 AMOB
Fully Electric Tube Benders eMOB 225 AMOB

Hunter Class Frigates

The Hunter Class Frigates will provide the Australian Defence Force with the highest levels of force and deterrence required during periods of global uncertainty, according to a media release from the Australian Prime Ministers office. They will have the capability to conduct a variety of missions independently, or as part of a task group. The frigates will also have the flexibility to support non-warfare roles, such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief worldwide.

The Hunter Class Frigates will begin entering service in the late 2020s. This will replace the eight Anzac Class frigates, which have been in service since 1996.

Hunter class frigates breakdown:

  • 150 metres long and 8,800 tonnes
  • Top speed in excess of 27 knots (over 31mph). This is provided by two electric motors, two diesel generators, and one gas turbine.
  • 7,000 mile range
  • Houses 180 crew, can accommodate 208.
  • Weapons include MU90 impact torpedoes, SM2 and ESSM missiles, Mk41 vertical launching system
  • Hull mounted sonar, towed array, and variable depth sonar systems.
  • Equipped with a MH60R combat helicopter and a mission bay for an unmanned system

eMOB-100 AT A GLANCE

  • Fully electric bender
  • Maximum Capacity: 100mm OD x 2mm wall thickness
  • X axis accuracy: +/- 0.05mm
  • Y axis accuracy: +/- 0.05 degrees
  • Z axis accuracy: +/- 0.05 degrees
  • Maximum Bending Radius: 400mm
  • 6100mm useful length
  • All Electric CNC pressure die assist as standard
  • Variable radius programmable as standard
  • Spring back compensation as standard
  • Safety Fence as standard
  • Laser scanner as standard
  • Wiper die support stack as standard
  • All electric vertical CNC pressure die assist
  • CE compliant as standard

eMOB-225 AT A GLANCE

  • Fully electric multi-stack bender
  • Maximum Capacity: 219mm OD x 12mm wall thickness
  • Left or right bending
  • 14 controlled axes
  • X axis accuracy: +/- 0.05mm
  • Y axis accuracy: +/- 0.05 degrees
  • Z axis accuracy: +/- 0.05 degrees
  • Maximum bending radius: 600mm
  • 6000mm useful length
  • 500mm maximum tool stack height
  • 10° per second bending speed
  • All Electric CNC pressure die assist as standard
  • Variable radius programmable as standard
  • Spring back compensation as standard
  • Software punching mechanism as standard
  • Welding seam-detection as standard